Costly Common Road Rules

Costly Common Road Rules

Filed under Information Centre

“Hopefully nothing comes in the mail” is something you don’t want to be saying after your commute to and from work.

We go over some expensive and all-too-common traffic infringements. Some penalties in particular can cause serious hip pocket pain and eat into savings.

Firstly, speeding fines:

NSW:

Offence:

Fine:

Demerit Points:

Up to 10km/h over the limit

$123

1

From 10-20km/h over

$285

3

From 20-30km/h over

$489

4

From 30-45km/h over

$935

5

More than 45km/h over

$2520

6

VIC:

Offence:

Fine:

Demerit Points:

Licence Suspension:

By less than 10 km/h

$207

1

-

10 km/h–24 km/h

$330

3

-

25 km/h–29 km/h

$454

-

3 months

30 km/h–34 km/h

$537

-

3 months

35 km/h–39 km/h

$620

-

6 months

40 km/h–44 km/h

$702

-

6 months

By 45 km/h or more

$826

-

12 months

SA:

Offence:

Fine:

Demerit Points:

Exceed Speed by 1-9km/h

$270

2

Exceed Speed by 10-19km/h

$496

3

Exceed Speed by 20-29km/h

$915

5

Exceed Speed by 30-44km/h

$1590

7

Exceed by 45km/h or more

$1780

9

QLD:

Offence:

Fine:

Demerit Points:

Less than 13km/h over

$270

1

13km/h to 20km/h over

$266

3

20km/h to 30km/h over

$444

4

30km/h to 40km/h over

$622

6

Exceed by 40km/h or more

$1,245

8

WA:

Offence:

Penalty Units

Demerit Points:

Not more than 9 km/h

2

1

9km/h to 20km/h over

4

3

20km/h to 30km/h over

8

4

30km/h to 40km/h over

16

6

Exceed by 40km/h or more

24

8

***The value of one penalty unit is $50.00.


TAS:

Offence:

Fine:

Demerit Points:

Not more than 10 km/h

$80

2

10km/h to 14km/h over

$110

2

15km/h to 22km/h over

$150

3

23km/h to 29km/h over

$250

3

30km/h to 37km/h over

$450

5

38km/h to 44km/h over

$650

6

Exceed by 45km/h or more

$900

6

NT:

Offence:

Fine:

Demerit Points:

Exceed speed limit up to 15km/h

$150

1

15km/h to 30km/h over

$300

3

30km/h to 45km/h over

$600

4

Exceed by 45km/h or more

$1,000

6

Common and (sometimes) forgotten traffic infringements:

Here are some other common offences easily committed when driving in Australia. Note that as fine amounts differ per state and territory, we have given an average dollar amount.

Making a U-turn where there is a ‘no U-turn’ sign:

Average fine: $400

In some states, you are allowed to make a U-turn at traffic lights unless there’s a sign saying you can’t. In SA and NSW, however, it's illegal to do a u-turn at any set of traffic lights.

Stopping on a freeway (unless it’s an emergency):

Average fine: $300

Fines range a fair amount depending on state. The definition of ‘emergency’ likely won’t cover a row with a passenger or phone call so make sure you exit the freeway safely if you need to stop.

Parking in disabled parking area:

Average fine: $500

Other than risking a confrontation with angry bystanders or other motorists, you’ll likely be hit with severe wallet pain. It can sometimes be confusing if you see another car in a disabled parking area but make sure to look at the permit, not the person.

Using a horn unnecessarily:

Average fine: $300

Just saying goodbye to a friend when you drive away from their house can land you in hot (and expensive) water. As most jurisdictions warn, ‘a driver must only use their horn to warn others’ so that goodbye toot won’t suffice. On the other hand, you’d have to be pretty unlucky to get ‘pinged’ when farewelling the family after a Christmas lunch or when you set off for a road trip .

Not removing ignition key (vehicle unattended) on public property:

Average fine: $120

This one sounds strange. On one hand - if I’m parked in a legal location, I’ll do what I want with my keys. On the other hand, some may reason - if you leave your keys in your car, you deserve a fine. Seems like thieves and law enforcement are against this so always lock your car and take your keys with you when you park your car.

Flashing high beams to warn drivers about speed cameras / RBTs:

Average fine: $120

This one is a bit of a grey area. In most Australian states, it’s not the actual act of warning other drivers, it’s the ‘incorrect’ use of high beams. Flashing your high beams to warn drivers about speed cameras or RBTs is considered ‘using light to dazzle other drivers’ as this type of police activity isn’t seen as a hazard for other road users - or at least it shouldn’t be.

Intentionally splashing a pedestrian:

Average fine: $140

This one probably should be more costly. If you intentionally drive through a puddle in order to splash a pedestrian, you risk getting fined - and probably yelled at. Most laws specify bus stops and mud so some (rude) drivers may be able to argue their way out of a fine if it’s clean water and not at a bus stop. The best bet; be polite and don’t try to splash people.

Road Rules Recap:

Here in Australia, we can often call ourselves ‘lucky’. Australian police forces are some of the most honest and efficient in the world. The bottomline is, don’t break the law and you won’t have to worry about hip pocket pain.

Make sure you’re up to date with your state’s registration and road laws by referring to their website.

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